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Writing Goals: September

I've seen a lot of writers participating in this monthly goal challenge and thought I'd weigh in. Not only is it fun to share, but declaring your goals publicly keeps you somewhat accountable as well.

This month I'd like to get 1/3 of the way through the first draft of my novel.

Is it a lofty goal? I'm not sure...I've known other writers who seem to be able to write an entire draft in a weekend flat and sometimes I feel a bit on a slow side. However, since writing is not my full time job I feel that 3 months is a decent goal for me. Since some writing days are much more productive than others, this allows me those occasions when writing day are disturbed or completed thrown out the window. Hey, life happens. 

What's your September goal? I'm also very curious to know how quickly everyone else writes. Is 3 months for a first draft reasonable?



Collected Works Blog Link Up-September 2014

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